Last edited by Tall
Saturday, August 8, 2020 | History

2 edition of Tuberculosis in history from the 17th century to our own times. found in the catalog.

Tuberculosis in history from the 17th century to our own times.

Stevenson Lyle Cummins

Tuberculosis in history from the 17th century to our own times.

With an introd. by Sir Arthur Salusbury Macnalty.

by Stevenson Lyle Cummins

  • 341 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published by Baillière, Tindall and Cox in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Tuberculosis -- History

  • Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRC310 C8
    The Physical Object
    Pagination205p.
    Number of Pages205
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17282081M

    tuberculosis (TB), contagious, wasting disease caused by any of several mycobacteria. The most common form of the disease is tuberculosis of the lungs (pulmonary consumption, or phthisis), but the intestines, bones and joints, the skin, and the genitourinary, lymphatic, and nervous systems may also be . A comprehensive textbook on tuberculosis that covers all aspects of the disease: epidemiology, microbiology, diagnosis, treatment, control and prevention. The main part of the book comprises very detailed and richly illustrated clinical chapters. The copious images are the advantage of this book. Chapters on new methods and treatments and on animal tuberculosis are included/5(4).

    In , tuberculosis (TB) was the leading cause of death in Canada. The bacterium that causes TB, the tubercle bacillus, was discovered by a German scientist, Robert Koch, in Proof that TB was contagious led to organized efforts to isolate those infected in sanatoria -- special hospitals where patients could rest and get fresh air and a. During the 17th century, exact pathological and anatomical descriptions of tuberculosis began to appear. In , Sylvius wrote his Opera Medica, in which he was the first to identify actual tubercles as a consistent and characteristic change in the lungs and other areas of consumptive earliest references to the infectious nature of tuberculosis also appeared in 17th century.

    Tuberculosis was one of the most common causes of disease in the 18th and 19th Centuries. The last stage of tuberculosis was also known as consumption in Victorian times, and was nearly always fatal. It is considered to be the leading cause of death by any microbial pathogen in the World’s history, claiming an estimated 1 billion lives. Tuberculosis in history, from the 17th century to our own times. by: Cummins, Stevenson Lyle, Published: () The conquest of tuberculosis by: Waksman, Selman A. Published: () Captain of death: the story of tuberculosis.


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Tuberculosis in history from the 17th century to our own times by Stevenson Lyle Cummins Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Tuberculosis in history: from the 17th century to our own times. [S Lyle Cummins]. Get this from a library. Tuberculosis in history, from the 17th century to our own times. [S Lyle Cummins]. Tuberculosis in History: From the 17th Century to Our Own Times [S. Lyle Cummins] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Tuberculosis in History: From the 17th Century to Our Own Times. Book: Tuberculosis in history from the 17th century to our own times. + pp. Abstract: After reading this book one cannot help feeling that the late Professor Lyle Cummins found much pleasure in the task that he had set himself, and that he has passed that pleasure to the reader of this enjoyable and informative by: 5.

Book: Tuberculosis in history from the 17th century to our own times. + pp. Abstract: The material selected by the late Prof. Lyle Cummins as the subject matter of this book presents a picture of the gradual discovery of the main clinical and pathological characteristics of human by: 5.

This book contains sketches of the contributions of various older workers on tuberculosis to present knowledge of the disease. The title is misleading, as one might suppose from it that the text would deal with the influence of tuberculosis on history.

The author was formerly professor of tuberculosis at the Welsh National School of Medicine. Consumption, phthisis and the White Plague are all terms used to refer to tuberculosis throughout is generally accepted that Mycobacterium tuberculosis originated from other, more primitive organisms of the same genusresults of a new DNA study of a tuberculosis genome reconstructed from remains in southern Peru suggest that human tuberculosis is less than.

In the 20th century, Tuberculosis was the leading cause of death in the United States. It was common knowledge that TB was extremely infectious and extremely deadly.

It was every American's responsibility to do their best to prevent the spread of this horrible disease. The Origin and History of Tuberculosis. words (12 pages) Essay in Anthropology.

In earlier times tuberculosis affected many people, and has recently dwindled in numbers. This used to be a major part of deaths up until the twentieth century, which is when the United States started coming out with vaccines and other forms of treatment.

Looking back now and refreshed from rereading Julius Wilson's three-part history of our organization (14–16), it is clear that the heritage of the American Thoracic Society, from its inception, derives from a single preoccupation—tuberculosis—and that this disease dominated the first half-century of Cited by: “The disease is still around, it's still contagious, and despite the fact that the vaccine costs approximately sixteen cents to produce, and $ to buy, tuberculosis continues to ravage periphery countries.

Millions of people die from tuberculosis every year - and it's totally treatable. This is a disease we can eradicate in our. Tuberculosis through history. Evidence that M. tuberculosis and humans have long coexisted comes primarily from studies of bone samples collected from a Neolithic human settlement in the eastern Mediterranean.

Genetic evidence gathered from these studies indicates that roughly 9, years ago there existed a strain of M. tuberculosis similar to strains present in the 21st century. Tuberculosis in history, from the 17th century to our own times by Stevenson Lyle Cummins Call Number: Crerar Stacks RCC92; Also available via HathiTrust Digital Library Publication Date: Author: Andrea Twiss-Brooks.

Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease usually caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) bacteria. Tuberculosis generally affects the lungs, but can also affect other parts of the body. Most infections show no symptoms, in which case it is known as latent tuberculosis.

About 10% of latent infections progress to active disease which, if left untreated, kills about half of those : Mycobacterium tuberculosis. During the 19th and early 20th centuries, the tuberculosis outbreak infected and killed many people.

In fact, towards the end of the 19th century about 70 to 90% of the urban population of both Europe and North America were infected.

Also, about 80% of the individuals who developed the disease died of it, and 40% of working-class deaths were. Tuberculosis is characterized as a social disease and few have been more inextricably linked with human history. There is evidence from the archaeological record that Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its human hosts have been together for a very long time.

The very mention of tuberculosis brings to mind romantic images of great literary figures pouring out their souls in creative works as their Reviews:   Ancient times: the first historical records. It has been hypothesized that the genus Mycobacterium originated more than million years cterium ulcerans, causing infections since ancient times, requires specific environmental conditions as reflected nowadays in its distribution worldwide [].

Three million years ago, an early progenitor of MT might have infected early hominids in Cited by: Tuberculosis has claimed its victims throughout much of known human history.

It reached epidemic proportions in Europe and North America during the 18th and 19th centuries, earning the sobriquet, “Captain Among these Men of Death.” Then it began to decline. Understanding of the pathogenesis of tuberculosis began with the work of Théophile Cited by: Hippocrates created the term phithis, or consumption, in BC, because of the significant weight loss associated with the disease.

Despite its frequency at the time, the cause of tuberculosis was unknown. Searching for a Cause. By the 17th century, anatomical and pathological descriptions of tuberculosis began to appear in the medical literature. The history of Colorado Springs is tied firmly to tuberculosis.

One of the deadliest diseases in the United States at the turn of the 20th century, tuberculosis is a bacterial condition that. Tuberculosis has been known to mankind since ancient times.

It is believed that the genus Mycobacterium was present in the environment about .Author(s): Cummins,Stevenson Lyle, Title(s): Tuberculosis in history, from the 17th century to our own times. Country of Publication: England Publisher: London, Baillière, Tindall and Cox, By the dawn of the 19th century, tuberculosis had killed one in seven of all people that had ever lived.

Browse images of America's fight against the deadly : American Experience.